Climate Change

by | Sep 22, 2017

Predictions for our changing climate paint an alarming picture—rising sea levels, changing weather patterns, and increased incidences of natural disaster e.g., the latest hurricanes in USA and Caribbean nations all threaten to greatly impact human life. While climate change impacts everyone, degrading resources and increasing instability will most greatly affect the lives of rural poorer people, the majority of whom are women, who depend upon natural resources for their livelihoods

Bare land due to lack of rain

Bare land due to lack of rain

In communities that rely on their environments to provide basic food, water, and energy resources, the impacts of climate change can be devastating.  Too much or too little water can decimate crops and force migration.  As vital resources become scarce, more time is devoted to resource collection, less healthy options are exploited, and less sustainable practices are employed.  For those who survive off natural resources, climate change presents a challenge that most communities are simply not prepared to face.

One of our film shows.

One of our film shows.

Despite the grim predictions, there is hope. The communities that most rely on natural resources can be equipped with knowledge to adapt to changes while also serving as a powerful force to mitigate future climate impacts.  At Amara, we recognize the powerful role that communities bordering protected areas play, and as the primary users of these resources, the role they can play in bolstering their community’s resiliency. To ensure this, we educate them through film shows, workshops/barazas to be responsible and manage their resources and renew their environments.  When these people are empowered to become stewards of their environments the result is communities that are better able to adapt to changes.  As resource degradation is both a result and a cause of climate change, women and men alike are enabled to restore degraded ecosystems and reduce activities that affect climate change

The Tsavo West National Park is a section of one of the largest wildlife conservancies on the planet, as well as one of Kenya’s largest wildlife national parks. It is well-known for its resident population of Red Elephants as well as the tale of the Tsavo Man-eaters. Unfortunately, most of the communities bordering these parks have never had a chance to visit them due to the cost. For these reasons Amara organizes game drives with Purdue University students each year into Tsavo West National Park. We also encourage children to form Wildlife Clubs and embrace their wildlife and environment. This year Mrabenyi Secondary School in Taita Taveta County had the opportunity to tour the vast Park and interact with the University students from USA.

 

tHistorically, the Tsavo Area is renowned for the Man-eaters of Tsavo, two mane-less lions who developed a taste to prey on humans back in the early 1900’s (various reasons are cited for this, one recently being that they suffered from tooth decay and pain that made hunting difficult for them!). Although they were later shot, they killed many people that were constructing the railway line connecting Mombasa and Nairobi. Additionally, it was the main battlefield between the Germans and the Britons in Africa in the course of World War I. Currently the area is very peaceful and is now famous for its resident Red-colored Elephants, that enjoy dust-bathing in the red colored soil. The serene environment of Tsavo comes mainly with thorny bushland, open grasslands and among the most beautiful scenic areas are; the Yatta plateau, the World’s longest lava flow stretching 290km; Mzima springs; Shetani Lava Flow; Chaimu Hill; and Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary.

 

 

 

 

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