Conservation of Nature Knows No Boundaries

by | Jun 23, 2017

We cannot brush aside problems that are linked to the environment, like internal conflicts, desertification, corruption and poverty. For a moment, we may assume that some of these issues do not concern us, but they do because we do not live in isolation. The international community must know that developed countries bear different responsibilities from those of the developing world, and they must understand that the development agendas of past ages might not have taken the health of the environment into consideration.

Brick making

Brick making

Whether this was true or not, the concern at the present moment, when some face an existential threat and others face a smoking hot threat, demands that we put the question of differences aside and save the sinking ship. In recognition that we all hold the present and future fate of the world; actions or omissions have potentially grave consequences.

Sand harvesting along the river banks

Sand harvesting along the river banks

Also we must recognize that the overall goal of environmental conservation on any level relies on what you and I do, on the way we behave. Environmental conservation is a relevant agenda both for the developing and developed worlds, not forgetting that the environment is a common, shared resource. After all, the external environment is just a reflection of the inner self.

If we want to save the environment and its species from extinction, we have to work across borders as their survival largely depends on habitats extending beyond national boundaries. With human populations growing – and corresponding increases in development, pollution, and consumption of natural resources – the need for international collaboration has never been greater.

 

Films shows on Conservation are an integral part of students’ lives

Films shows on Conservation are an integral part of students’ lives

Through our conservation programs at Amara, we are doing just that: helping local people to value and protect the world’s most treasured wildlife and habitats

The Tsavo West National Park is a section of one of the largest wildlife conservancies on the planet, as well as one of Kenya’s largest wildlife national parks. It is well-known for its resident population of Red Elephants as well as the tale of the Tsavo Man-eaters. Unfortunately, most of the communities bordering these parks have never had a chance to visit them due to the cost. For these reasons Amara organizes game drives with Purdue University students each year into Tsavo West National Park. We also encourage children to form Wildlife Clubs and embrace their wildlife and environment. This year Mrabenyi Secondary School in Taita Taveta County had the opportunity to tour the vast Park and interact with the University students from USA.

 

tHistorically, the Tsavo Area is renowned for the Man-eaters of Tsavo, two mane-less lions who developed a taste to prey on humans back in the early 1900’s (various reasons are cited for this, one recently being that they suffered from tooth decay and pain that made hunting difficult for them!). Although they were later shot, they killed many people that were constructing the railway line connecting Mombasa and Nairobi. Additionally, it was the main battlefield between the Germans and the Britons in Africa in the course of World War I. Currently the area is very peaceful and is now famous for its resident Red-colored Elephants, that enjoy dust-bathing in the red colored soil. The serene environment of Tsavo comes mainly with thorny bushland, open grasslands and among the most beautiful scenic areas are; the Yatta plateau, the World’s longest lava flow stretching 290km; Mzima springs; Shetani Lava Flow; Chaimu Hill; and Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary.

 

 

 

 

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